Wednesday, 9 June 2010

Value

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value

Definition: Worth, desirability or utility.

I was looking at a friend's photo on Facebook this morning. He's one of three friends I have out there job hunting at the moment, thanks to recession job losses. I know all three of them are struggling to find a new job and yet I also know that all three of them are awesome people who make this planet a better place simply for being here.

Last month another friend took his life. His reasons were complex and probably never known completely, but I do know his new self-employment was limping along and he felt trapped by lack of money... lack of hope.

My husband also went self-employed after he was retrenched. He's also pretty much limping along. I know he's good at what he does and the folk who do hire him are equally impressed, but they're just too few and too far between. I know he's feeling fairly worthless lately.

The last few months I've been browsing the job sites looking at what's out there, which is pretty much nothing in our area. I've been looking for myself as well as for my husband. What I've discovered is that I'm of absolute no value whatsoever. I have qualifications (art) that I've never been employed doing and work experience (library) that I have no qualifications for. Add to that the fact I've never worked in an office, never worked in retail, don't have my own transport and my haphazard health issues... I'm as likely to get a job as be hit by a comet!

I have never felt of less value than I have the last few months of looking for a job and the worst part is that I know I'm not the only one. Through Facebook, blogs, emails... there are so many good talented people who feel they have no value.

There's something so wrong about that!

Look through any newspaper and one thing stands out loud and clear - society values the ability to make money above all else. It doesn't matter if you hit your kids, drink and drive, pollute the planet, lie or steal... From politics to pop stars and salesmen to executives the message is clear - we will value and respect you as long as you bring in the money.

And we call ourselves an "intelligent life form"?

Money is an illusion, as our recent world bank fiasco has proven. I prefer to value people for what they do to make this world better for their being here.

I value those who want to make this world a better place - the builders of dreams and the sellers of hope. These are the people who should be the role models of our future generations. I value responsibility, integrity, sincerity, consideration, dedication and kindness.

What do you value?
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12 comments:

  1. Michelle you have value. Don't ever think that you don't. You are very creative and talented and generous and kind and you make the world a better place just because you are in it.

    I am sorry you and your husband are having to deal with looking for work and not finding what you are seeking. I know many others who are in the same boat. These are very tough times for many.

    I agree with your list of things to value. I value friendship too, including yours. I hope that things will turn around for you and your husband soon in the job market, but even if they don't, please remember that you are a worthy person to all those who know you, including me. Big hug to you, Michelle.

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  2. I entered this site by chance, but I found very interesting. A greeting to all the people who visit this page.

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  3. I value people. I honestly do. I have never given any importance to money. Oh, one needs it to survive these days, but that's that. It is sad how most "values" are counted in money now, especially now. You are considered to be an investment and nobody is willing to take any risks. That is sad, and I'm afraid it's going to be worse before we are done with this recess.

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  4. Money and financial success are the worst sort of illusion - always have been, perhaps always will be. Oh, maybe in some cultures they didn't call it 'money.' Perhaps they called it "the ability to hunt!" (bring home the bacon?) or some such.

    It's atavistic at the core: perhaps (badly) representing only the ability to survive tough times.

    I value friendship. But friendship requires trust, so I value integrity as a crucial & necessary component. Trust requires kindness as well, so that too is crucial. Honor is an old-fashioned word that sums it up well.

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  5. Daisy
    Bless you. Big ((hug)) back.

    You're certainly a friend I value highly too. XX

    Hi baresytapas
    Thank you (or should that be Gracias?) and I hope you stop by again. :-)

    RA
    You have always come across as a person who values others for who they are rather than what they have or do to make money. I've always liked that about you. :-)

    This is very true:
    "You are considered to be an investment and nobody is willing to take any risks."

    And yes, I think it will get worse before it gets better. So we hunker down and wait it out.

    Hi Hayden

    Good point about money's survival symbolism. Maybe even symbolic of the pecking order of the pack or herd?

    I like this too:
    "I value friendship. But friendship requires trust, so I value integrity as a crucial & necessary component. Trust requires kindness as well, so that too is crucial. Honor is an old-fashioned word that sums it up well."

    Integrity, trust, kindness and honour... wonderful things to value. :-)

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  6. @Hayden, enjoyed your comment; thank you.

    @Michelle, we went through tough times earlier this decade and somehow saw it through.

    W/o a doubt, there should be a modicum of money to live, otherwise it's quite easy to start feeling low on worth and value.

    That said, i think Mahatma Gandhi expressed it best: "The world has enough for every man's need, but not for every man's greed". Unfortunately we are in the greed boat now and, since Man(kind) isn't doing too much about it, guess we have to wait for Mother Earth to take corrective action, as in the case of Atlantis.

    Captcha: zater

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  7. I know what you mean, M. I'm also in the same boat as you are. I've never worked in an office and I have no qualification to work here 'coz my degree is English lit and if I want to teach here I still have to get a local certificate 'coz I'm basically not a native English speaker and I don't drive either, so getting a good job is like expecting a miracle 'coz there are no international companies in this small village.

    Every time I go unemployed again after I stop doing any training, I also struggle with my self-value. I really need to keep on telling myself that in God's eyes, I AM valuable just as I am and I CAN make a difference even when I don't earn a living (yet).

    It's really hard to shout out all the outer messages that scream out about "self-values" and "being successful people". I also try to remind myself that this is an exercise of a retirement period...what will happen to my self-value when I retire?

    You brought out GREAT points in this post about responsibility, integrity, sincerity, consideration, dedication, and kindness.

    And we ARE valuable creatures no matter what. You HAVE made a difference in the lives of many people, M...including ME!!! And that's of more worth than money - true that we can't live without money, but not having much money doesn't mean our value is less than others who have money. I hope you and or your hubby can find more income someway or another. I'll remember you in my prayers...

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  8. Oh typo...I mean it's really hard to shut up all the outer messages that scream out...

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  9. "I value those who want to make this world a better place - the builders of dreams and the sellers of hope. These are the people who should be the role models of our future generations. I value responsibility, integrity, sincerity, consideration, dedication and kindness."

    Michelle-you expressed it so well. There is nothing I could add, except to say that you are a valued, creative person.

    My best to you.

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  10. Hi Shastri

    I think your own comments are as worth noting as the quote by Gandhi.
    Thank you.

    Amel
    I never knew you had a degree in Eng Lit. Wow. :-o

    It's so sad how a few people can make us feel worthless because we don't fit into the categories they have decided are of value.

    I love this:
    "I really need to keep on telling myself that in God's eyes, I AM valuable just as I am and I CAN make a difference even when I don't earn a living (yet)."

    Yes, exactly! And I know my life is far richer for knowing and having you in it too. With love and (((HUGS)))

    Hi Kerry
    Thank you. Take a ((hug)) too. I'm in the mood to hug gthe people I value today. :-)

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  11. After studying English for 18 years prior to moving to Finland (and 4 years of pretty intensive English learning at the uni), having stayed here for a little over 3 years has definitely ruined my English ability 'coz Finnish is VERY different from English and Finnish and Indo has a little more in common than English he he...Plus when I go outside to the stores, everything is in Finnish and people here prefer using Finnish than English in the stores or daily lives.

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  12. Hi Amel
    Sorry, I missed your reply till today. I really do sympathise. My brain doesn't do multi languages well at all!

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